Posts Tagged Knog

Knog Boomers | Review

Most of you probably have a several weeks of morning and evening light left before you need to start illuminating yourself. But as an early morning commuter (I’m late if I’m not out the door by 6:20) I’ve already noticed the first signs of the disappearing daylight hours. For the last couple of days I’ve been wearing my sunglasses on my helmet for the first 10 minutes or so of my commute and, this morning, I preemptively got my taillight installed on my bike.

When I first started commuting back in January, it was dark when I left. Like night time dark. Like, “what kind of crazy idiot is out of bed, let alone out of the house?” dark. And, as a new commuter I was unprepared for the darkness. Lucky for me, Knog sent us a couple of Boomers (front and back) to test out.

Knog Boomer - Front

Visibility:

To be consistent with my previous technically specific reviews I will now avoid mentioning the lumen strength of the lights (50 lumens in the front, 15 lumens in the back) and just say that both lights are bright enough to hurt your eyes if you accidently turn them on while in your dark garage. That said, if you were to move the cars out of the garage and hide your bikes somewhere safe, you could turn them on – I’d recommend using the strobe flash feature on the white (front) and the random strobe on the red (back) – turn on some house music, and have a rave (in fact, Knog now offers wearable boomers, I assume these are for the rave crowd – if there is still such a thing).

Really, they’re bright and they flash. It’s fun, just don’t look directly at them.

While the front light is bright, it’s that unfocused bright that means people can probably see you from space, but you’re not going to be able to see the road much better. So, if you commute on poorly lit or unlit roads you’d be better off with a proper headlamp.

Knog Boomer - Front

Installation:

The Boomer is simple to install. It’s simple to remove. It’s so easy a hipster could do it – (you’re welcome, Knog, for the new tagline). Basically, for both the front and back Boomer, the silicone casing includes a silicone band and a little hook. So you just wrap the band around the bar or seat post and hook it to the hook. On my bike, this works really great for the seat post and the silicone casing prevents the light from sliding around as you ride. Things are a little different up front. My bike has these fat, oval, “ergo bars” which I quite like for holding onto, but, it turns out, are crap for mounting lights that have a fixed-length silicone band as a mounting device. The band just barely makes it all the way around my bars and catches the hook. When It’s installed, the light always looks like the hook and the band are about have a falling out, but so far it’s never happened.

Knog Boomer - Rear

Color:

These thing comes in many colors. Black is probably the most inconspicuous color the sell and white looks pretty ok on my black and white bike, but if you want everyone to know you’ve got your Knog Boomers installed on your bike, even in the day, by all means, get the blue, pink or red.

Other things to note:

If you’ve been paying attention, I’ve mentioned a couple of the light settings, modes, above, but in total there are four options: Constant, Strobe Flash, Fast Flash, and Random Flash. I never much pay attention to which flash setting I’ve got, so I just think of it as on, flash and off.

The Boomers I have take a pair of AAA batteries each. Next to 9V, AAA batteries are the most annoying battery size. On top of the overall annoyingness of AAA batteries, the Boomers seem to run through them pretty quickly (especially if you use the “solid” function). By the end of winter I was in the habit of charging/changing my batteries once a week. Knog offers a rechargeable set of Boomers now, and I sort of wish I had those instead.

My major compliant about the lights is pretty minor. But I have noticed than in certain circumstance the front light will suddenly change modes when you hit a bump in the road. I’ve noticed it seems to mostly happen when the batteries are running low, and I suspect it has to do with the fact that band is stretched so tightly around my fat handlebars. My theory is that the strained band is putting a strain on the rest of the silicone casing and either pulling the batteries out of place temporarily or cause the power/mode button to be depressed over harsh bumps (I’m talking crossing poorly maintained train tracks and jumping curbs). It’s not really difficult to deal with, if the light goes from flashing to flashing, I don’t even notice. The only annoying thing is if it goes from solid to flashing, you have to cycle through all of the modes to get it back to where it was.

I’ve ridden these things in the rain and in freezing temperatures and they held up well against the elements. I fully intend to use them again this winter and would recommend them to anyone shopping for bike lights. At $29.95 each, they’re pretty comparable to mid-range LED cycling lights.

Knog Boomer - Rear

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