Archive for category news

fiction + bicycles = good

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I meant to post this yesterday: Keith Snyder (@noteon) has announced the contributors to the anthology of bicycle fiction he’s putting together for publication in December. Looks like he’ll be posting some story previews here, so keep an eye out.

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LA Times – GM pulls “Reality Sucks” Ad

LA Times says GM pulls ad focused towards college students after negative feedback from cycling commuters.

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Attention Pedestrians, cyclists motorists are trying to kill you

I’ve seen a few posts this morning about this study that found about 1,000 pedestrians a year are injured by NY cyclists. Richard Masoner offers a little perspective:

Moreover, the number of “serious” injuries — defined as “skull fractures, internal injuries, broken or distorted limbs, unconsciousness, and severe lacerations” — caused by motor vehicles is double the total injuries to pedestrians in bicycle collisions.

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bicycle friendly and almost bicycle friendly

The League of American Bicyclists announced the newest round of Bicycle Friendly Communities today. And Sacramento was upgraded from a Bronze designation to a Silver designation. But, since I only live near Sacramento and almost never ride my bike in the city proper, I was more interested with one of the cities on the Honorable Mentions list, Rancho Cordova!

That’s right, I commute through a town that is, very nearly, bicycle friendly.

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It’s up to you, Jerry | Give Me 3

SB 910 made it through the California State Assembly yesterday. The bill would require motorists to give cyclists 3 feet when passing from behind. While the bill will need to go back to the State Senate tomorrow to approve some technical changes it is fully expected that it will end up on the Governor’s desk for signature.

While passage of the law should give cyclists in California reason to celebrate it doesn’t mean we should all abandon caution, or our helmets, and ride as if we have safety bubble around us. The fact is that we still live in a car centric nation and a culture that puts a greater value on quick and effortless travel than it does on the safety of those few of us who would, for whatever reason, pedal our commute.

Take, for example, this Letter to the Editor that I ran across in The Bakersfield Californian:

Robert Price’s Aug. 28 column, “Tweaking our too-snug car-bike interface,” was written, I believe, from the view of a cyclist. I believe Price is a frequent cyclist on the streets of Bakersfield. The 3-foot buffer for a cyclist is a great idea. However, there are dangers for all involved.

…To give the bikers an extra 3 feet means the automobile driver will need to move over to the left a few feet. Problem there is drivers in the next lane frequently cannot see the biker and wonder why in the world that “idiot” is moving over into his or her lane or driving so blasted slow. It’s a problem. I don’t know if SB 910 will solve the problem. I know if I were a cyclist, I’d rather ride on the sidewalk and dodge 170-pound pedestrians than on the street and dodge 2-ton automobiles.

Common sense is not all that common. Why not the sidewalk?

The author of this letter makes a careful effort not to be overtly anti-cyclist, but her suggestion that we cyclists be relegated to the sidewalk simply moves the safety problem out of her way. Her logic is that a 3-foot passing law is ok, but that it creates a “danger” for drivers because they might have to slow down when “that ‘idiot'” moves into his or her lane to pass a cyclist. To avoid the danger of having to use the brake pedal, the suggestion is that bikes, mine is usually moving at around 20 mph, negotiate the sidewalks they’d be expected to share with “170-pound pedestrians.” I’m not sure what she thinks is going to happen when a cyclist moving at 20 mph hits one of those pedestrians but, you know, “common sense is not all that common.”

I’ll take the 3-feet, thank you.

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he won’t say how he did it

He’s 16. He’s rode his bike across a lake. He’s not saying how.

via clusterflock

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Redesigned Grand Prix to return to Sacramento

Downtown Sacramento will host a new major criterium on September 10, bringing hundreds of top US cyclists back to the city for the final weekend of the national racing season. The Sacramento Grand Prix adopts the model set in 2010, a street-race that ushered in the prologue of the Amgen Tour of California.

The reborn Grand Prix criterium has been moved to a new slot in the racing calendar, occupying the weekend before the cycling industry’s biggest convention, Interbike, in Las Vegas, NV. Race organizers Project Sport hope the Grand Prix will come to be regarded as a memorable and important closing competition on the US racing schedule each year. Sacramento’s proximity to Las Vegas will make the race attractive to riders committed to attending Interbike.

The projected course will take 500 riders in six fields around a tight one-mile route around the capitol. The riders will complete 50 laps in total, creating a major visual attraction for the estimated 10,000 assembled spectators. Competitors are expected to range in ability from recognizable pro-tour household names down to first-time amateur racers. There will also be an over-35 field, and a law-enforcement category.

Grand Prix organizers conceived the event in response to the huge public support and turnout for the Amgen Tour of California over the last few years. Sacramento is frequently selected as a host for one of the stages of the ToC, but in the event that the city is passed-over in future years, the Grand Prix will provide local cycling fans with a major, all-day event which organizers and city officials hope will replace revenues normally filled by the Tour of California.

The criterium course begins and ends on L Street, opposite the Capitol. From there, riders travel west, then turn down 10th St, onto N St, then up 15th St before turning back onto L Street. The route encapsulates the whole of Capitol Park, providing plenty of opportunity for spectators and vendors to find a space on the inside or the outside of the course. A $10,000 prize is on offer, making the Sacramento Grand Prix one of the richest purses on the US Cycling schedule.

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another reason to ride your bike

If you live in the greater Sacramento area your chances of having you car stolen is among the highest in the country. A new study released by the National Insurance Crime Bureau put Sacramento at No. 6 for likelihood of auto theft in the entire nation in 2010. That’s up from No. 11 in 2009.

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but officer…

Diaz told investigators that he thought he hit a cyclist but he “didn’t want to get in trouble again” so he didn’t stop.

via Andrew

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protecting drivers from (sexy) cyclists

Miss Rijcken was wearing a short frilly, grey skirt and short light brown boots at the time.

For one NYPD officer, that constituted too much skin, Miss Rijcken claims.
She recalled: ‘He said it’s very disturbing, and it’s distracting the cars and it’s dangerous.
‘I thought he was joking around but he got angry and asked me for ID.’

via

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